“To Myself at Seven” by Samantha Lê published in Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review, Issue 46

I’m honored that my poem “To Myself at Seven” was selected for publication in the Spring 2017 issue of Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review.  [Available for purchase.] About “To Myself at Seven” I wanted to write a poem about being a girl, about how culture define a girl’s place in the world through gender-biased beliefs and limitations—limitations … Continue reading “To Myself at Seven” by Samantha Lê published in Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review, Issue 46

My Father’s Son

Your brown and raisin foot is watching me. It mocks my innocence and naiveté; it kicks and pokes and jabs and pinches me, with every move it labors bitterly. It speaks in a stranger’s tongue, so wise and old, the tongue of someone who has tasted gold, but swallowed dirt instead, and never told of … Continue reading My Father’s Son

“Second Name” by Samantha Lê published in the anthology Spring Mother Tongue, May 2017

Thank you Arlene Biala and the office of the Poet Laureate of Santa Clara County for putting together this inspiring project. About “Second Name” My journey started with the fall of Saigon when my family became refugees in a country that was once our home.  During the decade of waiting and failed attempts to leave, … Continue reading “Second Name” by Samantha Lê published in the anthology Spring Mother Tongue, May 2017

From the Platform on First Street

a dispassionate rain sprinkles colors onto glassy morning tracks faded creatures in shapes of blue and sleeplessness—going gone the warning whistles of the watchful conductor           gone the smoke that caught the wind and stained the air ~ by ​Samantha Lê --- First published in the anthology Invention: Poems that Celebrate Who … Continue reading From the Platform on First Street

“Last Bar in Okinawa” and “Home from College” by Samantha Lê published in Two Thirds North, 2017 issue

I’m happy to announce that my poems “Last Bar in Okinawa” and “Home from College” have been selected for publication in the 2017 issue of Two Thirds North.   To read the online version, please click here. “Last Bar in Okinawa” and “Home from College” is also be included in the 2017 print issue of Two Thirds North,  available for … Continue reading “Last Bar in Okinawa” and “Home from College” by Samantha Lê published in Two Thirds North, 2017 issue

“Six Year Old Boy with Lost Tricycle Looking at Mural on Museum Wall” published by Quatrain.Fish

Thank you Quatrain.Fish for publishing “Six Year Old Boy with Lost Tricycle Looking at Mural on Museum Wall.”  To read the poem online, please click here. About “Six Year Old Boy with Lost Tricycle Looking at Mural on Museum Wall” For this poem, I wanted to capture the abstraction of the mural art in language form, … Continue reading “Six Year Old Boy with Lost Tricycle Looking at Mural on Museum Wall” published by Quatrain.Fish

“Reeducation” by Samantha Lê published in Pamplemousse Magazine, Spring 2017 issue

I’m honored that my poem “Reeducation” has been selected for publication in the spring/summer 2017 issue of Pamplemousse.   To read the online version, please click here. "Reeducation" will also be included in the spring/summer 2017 print issue of Pamplemousse, which will be available May 2017. About “Reeducation” The speaker in the poem is a war … Continue reading “Reeducation” by Samantha Lê published in Pamplemousse Magazine, Spring 2017 issue

Yellow Fruit Bowl

Your half eaten apple lies rotten— a mutilated carcass— in our yellow fruit bowl. I can't throw it out, this oxygen-infested fruit, because you still breathe within it. And I haven't picked the fruits like you've asked me; your sun-burn apples and oranges still hang limply from their branches in our yard; waiting... as I … Continue reading Yellow Fruit Bowl

Dear Husband

She is your daughter. Your tongue flaps, like a catfish dragged from muddy water on pointed hook, between her iron jaws. Jaws that snap shut into the flat line of your EKG the day your hairy heart stopped. Each time she smiles your cigarette- stained teeth grind me in the face, daring me to hold … Continue reading Dear Husband

On “The Hanging Family Tree”

“The Hanging Family Tree” employs what Robert Pinsky, in his book The Sounds of Poetry, calls “like and unlike sounds” in order to intensify the meaning of key thematic lines and to create shifts in the musical effects of the poem.

Searching for Religion in Iced Tea

I. The voice of god stomps through centuries and blood baths—like persistent wild flowers sprouting through the cracks of fallen civilizations— to reach my ears.  It is as soothing as a summer afternoon in the Arizona desert—with naked skin charred and scorched by blades of sun. His holy third eye blinks to reveal gray caterpillar … Continue reading Searching for Religion in Iced Tea

Mary Jane

Oh, Mary Jane, your bitter, sweet taste still lingers in my mouth, as you curl and dance from my drunken lips. Your shapeless tongue licks and tickles my nose, like a saxophone reed that vibrates sadly inside this Paris tunnel, on a sticky August evening. I hang on to you, just to breathe you, like … Continue reading Mary Jane